It was a crazy time to watch vendors in the 1980s and the early 1990s. The crowds that gathered kept an eye out for purchase looked like something out of the Cabbage Patch Kid trend of merely a few years previously. Swatch watches were sold at $30 a timepiece. It was available in a variety of designs and colors. Customers would jostle one another in the hopes of racking up a Swatch. Vendors often set a one-watch-per-customer limitation because of the demand.

The Beginnings

To recognize the unique allure of Swatch watches, we should go back in the 1970s. Swiss watches were surpassed by quartz-powered electronic imports from Japan. Casio was the among those that were economical to create and cheap to market. Faced with selecting a top-quality look at hefty prices or going with the digital design, consumers flocked to the imports. The company was down. Factories were shutting. People were loosing jobs.

Fortunately, several things were taking place that would certainly show to provide salvation for the Swiss. ETA SA was a firm that made watches. It was directed by Ernst Thomke. They lately invested in crafting a plastic prototypes watch that was one item and bonded together. This economized the whole process, straying people away from handmade companies to mass-produced ones. These watches only need 51 components versus the 91 that many designer companies use at the time.

The concern was why a person might select a Swatch watch over a Japanese digital design. They operated in the idea that “Swiss watches” still held considerable allure in the same way someone may choose a genuine Chicago deep-dish pizza over an imitator’s version. With this guiding principle, the Swiss company launched the first Swatch in Zurich in March of 1983.

But the procedure that permitted Swatch watches low-production cost created a new issue: mass-producing meant that the timepiece and bands were almost always similar in size and shape. If the watch’s basic appearance couldn’t be altered, how would it stand out?

The idea that came out was that the watches should look like neckties or other style accessories. No person owned just one tie, headscarf, or a pair of stilettos. People have many to choose from.

Why Swatch Watches Was a Hit in The 80s

At the behest of advertising expert Franz Sprecher, Swatches were soon swamping stores in various colors and styles on the bands and even the timepiece itself. “Watch wardrobing” was a thing. This means coordinating your watches based on attire or celebrations. Somebody who purchased a red Swatch for summer lounging might choose a black one as a professional attire component. Swatches retailed for $30 to $40 apiece, so buying more than one was financially feasible.

This then opened a new marketing method, one Thomke, Hayek, and their coworkers had not quite expected: Collectors went wild on Swatches.

Effective Strategies

Swatch ad / via pinterest

Swatch held a biannual collection of 22 to 24 fresh watch releases. In 1984, they had Kiki Picasso to design a collection. As if a prelude to the tennis shoe style sensation of the 90s followed, these partners placed unique stamps on the Swatches, which worked as a type of canvas for their imaginative expression.

The 1985 “Jellyfish” model was straightforward. The 1989 “Dadali” had a confront with Roman characters that seemed melting off the face and onto the band. Examples included cuffs to recognize Mozart or decorated with artificial hair. There were Mom’s Day editions and also editions commemorating the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution. Some bands even have scent. These were crazy times.

Though no one puts on disguises to acquire Swatch watches anymore, the company is still providing brand-new launches. While the firm has seen a decrease in sales over the years, the brand’s affection is not likely to disappear anytime quickly.